Essay: Why We're Reclaiming Sundays for Hospitality

If you grew up in a church setting, you may have known people whose homes were regularly open to guests on Sundays. However, if you're still part of the church today, you've probably noticed that most of us fill our Sundays with—well—not hospitality. Once the formal gathering time is over, we shake a few hands and then we're off to shop, watch a movie at the theatre, take the kids to soccer, or catch up on housework. Lest you think I'm pointing fingers, I've done all of the same things on Sunday afternoons as well (except take my non-existent kids to soccer) and there's nothing morally wrong with such activities. But lately we've been  asking ourselves if there is a better way to spend our time on Sundays.

Paul wrote, "'I have the right to do anything,' you say—but not everything is beneficial. 'I have the right to do anything'—but not everything is constructive." Sure, we can do many things on Sunday. But for us, we're realizing that one of the most beneficial and constructive way to invest our Sundays is by giving and receiving Christian hospitality. Here are a few reasons why we think reclaiming hospitality on Sundays in particular is worthwhile. 

(Note: Please don't get stuck on the word "Sunday". I know that for some of us, Sunday is not the day that we meet with other believers. If "Sunday" doesn't work in your context, please apply these ideas to the day of the week when you are able to meet others to worship God together.)

We're reclaiming Sundays for hospitality because...

...eating together has been a tradition of the church since its early days. 

When we read about the early church in Acts, sharing meals in homes was a regular part of their practice. To this day, eating together remains an important part of fellowship in your local gathering. Sure, it's not a command, "Thou shalt eat together after worshiping together." But if it is something the church has done for thousands of years, there must be something to it. Besides...

...Sunday is a day when we see others at church anyway.

Sunday is the day when we usually meet with our local fellowship. We currently live within walking distance of the hall where our fellowship meets, but others ride or drive 30 minutes or more to meet us there. Inviting people over after church is often more convenient and natural than asking them to come to our home another day of the week.

...Sunday is a day when people often have spare time.

I asked my husband to help me with this list and he stated the obvious: for many of us, Sunday is a day off, which means that most people have a bit more time to enjoy a meal together. Also, for those who are struggling with temptation, loneliness or anything else that seems to be accentuated when he or she has hours alone with no plans, being invited to spend time with believers on Sunday can be a lifeline.

...it makes Sunday a distinct, fellowship-oriented day. 

Another thing we like about inviting someone to "come 'round" on Sunday (as our friends from New Zealand say it) is that it keeps church from becoming just one of many pitstops on a day that is like every other. Many churches feel like spiritual gas stations, where people drive into the pews for an hour or so, get a quick spiritual fill-up, and drive on to do the rest of their Sunday errands. But one hour of being preached or sung at doesn't top up a soul running on empty after a long week in the world. Sunday hospitality can make Sunday a uniquely edifying day, also because...

...spiritual conversation comes up naturally on Sundays. 

When you've just heard teaching or sung good songs together, it's natural to steer the conversation in a spiritual direction. It can be as simple as asking, "Did you learn anything new in the message?" or "What is something you heard that will help you this week?" Recently a friend joined us for Sunday lunch, and within minutes of arriving he was telling my husband about the sermon at his church that morning. The words he and we had just heard set the tone for our afternoon together. 

...it starts the week on a positive, encouraging note. 

The people in our German fellowship have faced many discouraging circumstances in the last year, and some Sundays our gathering is small. We haven't received a lot of invitations to Sunday lunch, and so we know that others probably haven't either. There are some kinds of ministry that we cannot have because German is not our native language, but inviting people over is something that doesn't take advanced German skills. Through sharing our Sunday afternoons, we can remind people that God is going with them into the new week, and that we are, too. Sunday hospitality encourages us and others.

 As I was preparing this post, I remembered these words from Rosaria Butterfield, one of my hospitality heroes. She says that Sunday is the perfect day to allow people into our lives, even uninvited.  "Why do we make certain days ‘family days’? Sunday is the Lord’s Day. It is not ‘family day.’ It is the day for God’s people to be in each other’s lives without invitation." Those of us who are Christians belong to a family much wider than our blood families, and our homes should be open to that wider family.

We're not Sunday hospitality heroes. Actually, we're just a few weeks into our goal of being more regular about Sunday hospitality in particular. I'm not sure how often we'll have guests on Sundays, but our goal is to make it happen more often than not, like the early church and many godly people before us. Articulating some of the reasons why hospitality is a worthwhile investment of our Sundays (which belong to God, after all) has been helpful to me. In the coming weeks I'm looking forward to sharing a few ideas about how to reclaim Sunday hospitality, with stories from people whose lives were changed—or are still being changed—through giving and receiving Sunday hospitality. But before we get to that, who will you have over this Sunday?