Essay: How We're Reclaiming Sundays for Hospitality

In my last post, I wrote about a few reasons why we've been trying to have guests over more often on Sundays. The Bible commands hospitality, but it doesn't command Sunday hospitality. However, I wrote about why we are trying to have more Sunday guests. It's because: 

...eating together is a long-held church tradition. 
...Sunday is a day when we see others at church anyway.
...Sunday is a day when people often have spare time.
...it makes Sunday a distinct, fellowship-oriented day. 
...spiritual conversation comes up naturally on Sundays, and
...it starts the week on a positive, encouraging note. 

We've also been thinking about how to turn our good intentions into actions. Here are a few things that are helping us make Sunday hospitality a reality more often than not.

We're not making a lot of other Sunday plans.

Reserving time on Sunday afternoons to give or receive hospitality is something that is possible when we we make it a priority. We try to limit how many recreational weekend getaways or activities that could be done at other times keep us from being regularly present with other believers on Sundays. We know that if we choose to spend every other weekend out of town, Sunday hospitality and fellowship won't happen much. Thankfully, neither of us have jobs that require Sunday hours, although we know that for some believers that poses a challenge to sharing Sunday meals.

We're attending (and encouraging others to attend) the monthly Sunday potlucks at our fellowship.

Our fellowship usually shares a meal together every first Sunday of the month and we do our best to be there. In the last few months, the potluck attendance was waning, and so we encouraged people to put reminders out ahead of time, and tried to take along a bit of extra food in case people forgot to bring something. We can encourage people who plan Sunday meals by attending and helping out. If your fellowship doesn't have a regular time to eat together, this might be something you could easily organize.

We're trying to keep our Sunday hospitality simple. 

"When we keep the meal simple, having Sunday guests doesn't have to mean exhausting ourselves."

This is something I have to constantly remind myself (especially in Europe, where our guests may be accustomed to fine cuisine): our guests aren't coming primarily for the food, they're coming to spend time with us. The food is secondary. If I come home from church and rush around frantically, Sundays will be stressful. When we keep the meal simple, having Sunday guests doesn't have to mean exhausting ourselves.

(Note: we might assume eating out rather than in would be the best way to keep Sunday meals simple. However, we prefer to eat in rather than out, because our home sets a better stage for freer, more intimate fellowship than a restaurant does. That said, we do what we can with our time and resources. Some Sundays we haven't taken the time to prepare a meal at home, and we invite others to eat out with us. If we aren't offering to pay the whole tab, we try to go somewhere affordable so the price won't stop our friends from coming along.)

We're trying to intentionally host people from our church whom we don't know very well. 

When making invitations, we try to think about who might be encouraged by a visit with us, not just whom we would have fun hosting. When we have the same guests over and over, it's easy for the conversation to move toward common hobbies or recreational topics, but adding a less-known person or two to the group (or hosting accquaintances on their own) can help keep the talk from turning to trivialities. Recently we had several guests that we didn't know very well, and we asked them to tell us the stories of how they came to know Jesus. Learning how God reached into their lives and rescued them was one of my favourite parts of the afternoon.

We're not having guests every Sunday. 

It sounds funny to say that we're reclaiming Sundays for hospitality by not having guests every Sunday! But for us, every Sunday can't be a have-people-over Sunday. Some weeks are just too busy,  and a long Sunday afternoon nap is in order. We're trying to make sharing Sunday lunch a rule rather than an exception, but sometimes we need a quiet Sunday to rest and reconnect to God and to each other in a way that isn't possible when we're serving guests. (Today was one such Sunday.) Not having guests every weekend affords us the energy to enthusiatically host guests when they do come. 

"Not having guests every weekend affords us the energy to enthusiatically host guests when they do come."

Hosting guests always makes our Sundays more beneficial and constructive than they would have been otherwise. We feel more connected to our local fellowship and to the family of God. We hope you'll find the same thing, as you generously serve through Sunday hospitality. How are you reclaiming Sundays for hospitality?