Ideas: Christian Hospitality to Mormon Missionaries

A few weeks ago, we had some American Mormon missionaries who work in our city over for supper. I met them on a train here here in Germany, and as North American expats here, we instantly had something in common. After chatting for half an hour on the train, we exchanged numbers and they texted us the next day to ask if we wanted to meet up. My husband and I asked what they like to eat and invited them to come over for a meal about a week later. During that week we took in a lot of information so that we could have an intelligent conversation with them.

We were not sure what their plan for the evening would be: would they want to discuss Mormonism the whole time, or would they be happy to spend the evening small talking with North Americans and not proselytizing? In the end, they did both. We had a nice conversation during supper about our backgrounds, our families, and life as expats in Germany. Around the end of the meal, we started talking about more spiritual topics and they even shared an introductory lesson about Mormonism with us. We read a few portions of the Bible and the Book of Mormon with them, and interacted with some of their ideas. The conversation was pleasant, but by the end of the evening they could see that we were not planning on giving Mormonism a try. 

Overall, we thought it was a really profitable evening, and would encourage well-prepared, prayerful Christians to consider the next Mormon missionaries they see as potential supper guests! After all, it's their job to hang out with people, right? Why not with you? 

I don't want to make this a "how-to" post because we've hosted Mormons only once. I just want to share some thoughts about why inviting Mormon missionaries into your home might be a valuable investment of your time. 

Here are a few things that make Mormon missionaries easy to have over for a meal:

They're young and unintimidating.

I knew that Mormon missionaries always look young, but I found out from our guests that people older than 27 can't "serve a mission" with the Mormon church. Many Mormon missionaries, like the ones who came here, go on their mission almost directly out of high school. Our guests were about 20 years old.

They're mannerly.

Our guests asked polite questions throughout the meal, had good table manners, offered to help clean up afterward, and didn't really force any of their "church talk" on us. I think this probably comes from their family upbringing but maybe also from training they receive before being sent out. Mormons are known for their good manners and our guests were no exception; I've had Christian guests who had much poorer manners than these two.

They're probably lonely.

While Mormons are serving their mission (two years for guys, one-and-a-half years for girls), they're only allowed two phone calls home...per year. They can email their families on Sundays only, and I think they have limited access to the internet. Not only are they moved far from home for the mission, often to a foreign country, but they may also be moved around to various cities during that time. Our guests had lived in a variety of places in Germany and every time they switch locations, their missionary partner changes, too. I'm sure their being cut off from their families and friends (not to mention being hassled by people who don't appreciate having their doors knocked on by Mormons) makes them sincerely glad when someone reaches out to them in friendship.

They're fairly genuine. 

We didn't find our Mormon missionaries hard to talk to. They had never met my husband until he let them in the door, but they laughed openly and told us about their siblings, vacations they had taken, what they like to cook, and more. They helped themselves to a third round of burgers. One in particular had such a sweet smile on his face when he talked about the privilege of serving the LDS church. I didn't sense that they were intentionally seeking to lure us into a religion that they know to be false. 

They're comfortable discussing spiritual topics.

We are always glad to have guests who want to discuss spiritual topics, and few are as eager for those conversations as Mormon missionaries! One of the missionaries offered a hearty "Amen!" to my husband's prayer before the meal, and after my husband asked a question or two that led in a slightly spiritual direction, they asked each of us our religious background and allowed us to share our individual stories of coming to know Jesus. They didn't interrupt us or look bored when we opened the Bible with them. They're trained to chat about religious topics all day—this is their thing!

They have a predictable worldview.

Most worldviews are not as easy to pin down as the Mormon worldview. There's no way to research "What does a Hindu believe?" and really have a handle on your particular Indian guest's beliefs. Likewise, it can take many conversations with your atheist coworker to find out what he or she believes on different topics. However, Mormons believe a specific set of doctrines and have been drilled in their basic tenants and how to share them. They have a particular routine and an entry-level conversation with a Mormon missionary will probably hit a certain range of topics which a Christian can be prepared to talk about. Their goal is to do an introductory lesson series with people whom they meet, and I'm sure you can find the lessons online if you want to prepare for a discussion.  

But here's what you need to watch out for when having Mormon missionaries in your home for a meal:

They're trained to make their gospel sound as similar as possible to yours. (Newsflash: it isn't.) They're also trained to handle any objections smoothly. 

Our guests were very smooth and approachable in the way that they shared their beliefs with us. They welcomed our questions and gave us well-prepared answers. We told them several times that the Bible contradicted things they shared with us in their introductory lesson, and we showed them verses or information that contradicted their words exactly, but it didn't seem to concern them (even though they claim to hold the Bible in high regard.) At the end of the evening, one of them was still smiling sweetly at us and telling us that "basically we believe the same thing".  You really must be careful entering into conversations with people who are preaching another gospel, to be sure you know how to explain the true gospel.

Because of the last point above, I suggest the following:

Christian hospitality to Mormons needs to be offered with wisdom. It should not be offered:

...alone, especially not with missionaries of the opposite gender.

Mormon missionaries come in pairs, and it only seems wise that they should not outnumber the hosts, if at all possible. Also, my husband and I hosted together, but I would not have invited the Mormon guys over if my husband were not home. As a single, if you want to invite Mormon missionaries over, ask a wise Christian friend to join you and host guests of your own gender. (I don't suggest the gender rule just because they're LDS; when I was single I didn't invite guys who were not related to me to come over for meals unless there was at least another girl present.)

...by new Christians (at least not on their own).

I heard the story of a young man who had become a genuine Christian, but almost "accidentally" became a Mormon because the Mormon missionaries whom he met were so kind and convincing, and he thought that they believed the same things as he did. It's dangerous to expose yourself to false teaching while you're still learning basic elements of the truth. We were politely asked if we would "pray and ask God if the Book of Mormon is true."  I told the guests that the Bible already has made it clear that it is not—no need to pray about it. Even when my husband disagreed with them, they had smooth wording to try to erase our differences. While we were not deceived by them, obviously many people are. Exposing yourself to teaching that twists the truth is not something to be careless about.

...without prayer and preparation.

If you are planning to invite Mormon missionaries over for a meal, pray before, during and after, and also ask friends who will not be present to be praying with you. 

As I mentioned, it's not hard to find resources about what Mormons believe or resources contrasting the Bible and the Book of Mormon, etc. There are hundreds of resources and testimonies online for a Christian who is preparing to talk with Mormons. One of our favourites was this one-hour video by Unveiling Grace. Micah, one of the guys who is interviewed in this video, had a life-changing encounter with a gracious Christian on his Mormon mission. This former Mormon also shares a few good points if you're interacting with Mormons. Many of the resources online will also point you to Bible passages which clearly differ with Mormon teaching, like the book of Galatians, or Romans 3-5.

...in a way that makes others think that you are endorsing the Mormon message.

If you have LDS missionary guests visiting your home more than once, especially if the guests are males wearing white shirts and name badges, neighbours who observe this may start to think that you are a Mormon. Be aware of this possibility, and if you know that someone else has seen (or will see) them coming or going from your home, you might want to talk to that neighbour about why the Mormons visited you. Bringing it up might even provide an opportunity to discuss with your neighbour why you are not LDS! Having Mormon missionaries in for tea or a meal a few times is different, too, than allowing them to stay in your home for an extended stay, which might look like you are supporting them. In our case, neighbours might have seen our guests come to the front of our apartment building, but it would be hard for others to know which home in the building they were visiting. 

If having Mormon missionaries in your home might be difficult due to extraordinary circumstances with your very-observant neighbours, meeting the missionaries at a coffee shop where acquaintances are less likely to spot you might also be an option, to engage them in meaningful conversation outside your home.

I hope this post encourages you to wisely consider opening to your home to Mormon missionaries. There are probably some in your area, as they are sent to most countries in the world. Because Mormons tend to spend a lot of time with other Mormons, your invitation might be be the first time your Mormon missionary has a meal with Bible-believing Christians. (One of our guest's ancestors have been Mormons since around the time of Joseph Smith.) What a great opportunity for true Christian hospitality!  Mormon missionaries in your home get to see that—contrary to what they have been taught—there are genuine believers outside the LDS church.

In the secular West, it's unique to have American strangers in our homes with whom we can so easily talk about the things that matter most to us. We thought it was important to make it clear to our guests that we did not agree with the gospel they were preaching, but in so doing we were able to explain how their teaching contradicts the Bible.

We are still praying for our Mormon neighbours, but I thought that our part in their story was otherwise over, since they knew we were not easy converts. However, today—about three weeks after our meal together—I got a text message asking if we want to get together again. Maybe another meal with the Mormon missionaries is in store for us? I'm not sure yet.

Edit: I forgot to mention their dietary restrictions in this post. As far as I know, Mormons are not supposed to drink anything with caffeine (mainly coffee and white, black or green tea) or any alcohol.